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Towards explaining the health impacts of residential energy efficiency interventions – A realist review. Part 1: Pathways

This paper is Part 1 of a realist review that tries to explain the impacts of residential energy efficiency interventions (REEIs) on householder health. This first part provides a review of the explanatory factors of the three key pathways, namely warmth in the home, affordability of fuel and psycho-social factors, and the pitfall of inadequate indoor air quality.

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Bundling and stacking in bio-sequestration schemes: Opportunities and risks identified by Australian stakeholders

This paper provides the first empirical analysis of the opportunities and barriers of bundling and stacking carbon and biodiversity credits as articulated by policymakers and academics, in Australia.

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The relationship between intergenerational transfers, housing and economic outcomes

This research addresses three distinct but related questions around intergenerational transfers (inter vivos gifts and bequests), housing outcomes, and related economic outcomes.

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Australian demographic trends and their implications for housing subsidies

This Positioning Paper is the first output of a project that aims to forecast future housing subsidies that will accompany projected demographic changes and the challenges these trends may pose for the fiscal sustainability of housing policy.

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Emergent processes of adaptive capacity building: Local government climate change alliances and networks in Melbourne

This paper presents a critical review of multi-level climate governance and adaptive capacity building in the context of Melbourne, Australia. The research highlights the current and potential role of regional alliances to overcome structural, institutional and political obduracies as evidence of progress in building adaptive capacity at the local government and community scale.

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Using social data in strategic environmental assessment to conserve biodiversity

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) provides a framework for integrating information on the social determinants of conservation feasibility with supporting environmental legislation in order to achieve enhanced conservation outcomes. In this paper we argue that data on the social context of land use plans are vital to ensure effective biodiversity conservation outcomes that result from SEAs.

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City of the Spectacle: White Night Melbourne and the politics of public space. Australian Geographer

Public policy frequently is utilised as a medium to facilitate or restrict access to public space, and to privilege economic priorities. In this context urban arts festivals are used as a means to generate dominant narratives of place and use of public space. The present paper explores this tension through an examination of the role of urban arts festivals in spatial politics.

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Domestic residential garden food production in Melbourne, Australia: A fine-grained analysis and pilot study

Even though cities cover approximately only three per cent of the earth's land area, they are often located on what previously was prime agricultural land. In line with what was common historically, many cities around the world are now deliberately seeking to promote and expand agricultural production within their borders. The paper presents the results of a fine-grained study of 15 selected householders in metropolitan Melbourne.

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Subdivision policy and planning for bushfire defence: A natural hazard mitigation strategy for residential peri-urban regions in Victoria, Australia

This paper investigates subdivision design as one such mitigation technique. Roads and other forms of access are vital to successful bushfire response by fire brigades. The research examines the effectiveness of current policy to provide adequate access and suppression opportunities for firefighters in peri-urban areas, with particular reference to Victoria.

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Urban climate justice: creating sustainable pathways for humans and other species

This paper provides a critical overview of the emergent field of urban climate justice which focuses on the complex links between environmental sustainability, human vulnerability and biodiversity loss in the natural environment. This is an interdisciplinary agenda demanding new forms of sustainability research and practical engagement underpinned by calls for a more integrated approach to eco-social justice principles around human and other species equity in cities.

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Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

Climate adaptation research is expanding rapidly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. This new ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.

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The Little Things that Run the City: How do Melbourne’s green spaces support insect biodiversity and ecosystem health?

With the present work we aim to expand this circle so that it may also encompass the conservation of insect and other invertebrates in urban environments. We are driven by a will to ‘say a word on behalf of the little things that run the city’.

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Measurement matters in managing landscape carbon

Carbon stocks and emissions are quantified using many different measures and metrics, and these differ in their surrogacy, measurement, and incentive value. To evaluate potential policy impacts of using different carbon measures, we modeled and mapped carbon in above-ground and below-ground stocks, as well as fluxes related to sequestration, oxidation and combustion in the Ex Mega Rice Project Area in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.

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Urban climate justice: creating sustainable pathways for humans and other species.

This paper provides a critical overview of the emergent field of urban climate justice which focuses on the complex links between environmental sustainability, human vulnerability and biodiversity loss in the natural environment. This is an interdisciplinary agenda demanding new forms of sustainability research and practical engagement underpinned by calls for a more integrated approach to eco-social justice principles around human and other species equity in cities.

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Toward reflexive climate adaptation research.

This new ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.

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On Ambivalence and Hope in the Restless Search for Community: How to Work with the Idea of Community in the Global Age

This article extends Delanty’s conception of community formation by suggesting a distinction between ‘grounded’ and ‘projected’ communities. It draws on the author’s research to highlight the importance of working more thoughtfully with the idea of community. It notes that the sociology of community has failed to take account of more than 40 years of community development practice.

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Housing, households and climate change adaptation in the town camps of Alice Springs

This chapter explores the adaptive capacity of Indigenous households using the case study area of the town camps of Alice Springs in central Australia. Using social practices for comfort as a way of understanding how households adapt to changing climate and other dynamic factors around housing provision, a range of adaptive practices and vulnerabilities to climate change are revealed.

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Low carbon urban transitioning: From local experimentation to urban transformation?

In this paper, we review the critical literature on low carbon governance and socio-technical transitions and present a set of criteria by which we propose it is possible to assess the emergence of and/or progress towards low carbon urban transition. We then apply this approach to a case study.

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Implementing backcasting for conservation: determining multiple policy pathways for retaining future targets of endangered woodlands in Sydney, Australia

Developing conservation policy is a challenging process, often impeded by a lack of clear objectives and a limited understanding of the pathways to achieve them. Here, the utility of target-based ‘backcasting’ is demonstrated for developing effective conservation policies.

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Prioritising urban habitats for connectivity conservation: integrating centrality and metapopulation metrics

Identifying important habitat patches in ecological connectivity is a priority for many conservation strategies, and the application of ‘graph theory’ has been shown to provide useful information on connectivity. This paper presents a study that aims to define a new set of metrics and compares these with traditional graph-based metrics, used in the prioritization of habitat patches for ecological connectivity.

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Asset poverty, precarious housing and ontological security in older age: an Australian case study

Over two-thirds of Australians are owner-occupiers and a majority of the population holds most of their wealth in housing. In this paper we look at housing career pathwaysinto precarious housing in older age, its impact on older Australians’ ontological security and coping strategies as they grapple with the housing circumstances that typically accompany asset poverty.

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No Home Away from Home: A Qualitative Study of Care Leavers’ Perceptions and Experiences of ‘Home’

This paper explores the cultural and biographical specificity of home by examining the connections between young people's experiences of out-of-home care and their definitions of home. The paper draws on 77 in-depth interviews with young people who had lived away from their families in the Australian out-of-home care system.

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Perverse incentives risk undermining biodiversity offset policies

Offsetting is emerging as an important but controversial approach for managing environment-development conflicts. Biodiversity offsets are designed to compensate for damage to biodiversity from development by providing biodiversity gains elsewhere. Here, we suggest how biodiversity offset policies can generate behaviours that exacerbate biodiversity decline, and identify four perverse incentives that could arise even from soundly designed policies.

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Policy narratives versus everyday geographies: Perceptions of changing local space in Melbourne’s diverse north

This paper presents a comparative case study of two northern suburbs in Melbourne, Australia, in order to analyse local perceptions of proximity, mobility, and spaces of community interaction within diverse neighbourhoods experiencing socioeconomic and demographic transition. We first look at government policies concerning the two suburbs, which position one suburb within a narrative of gentrification and the other within a narrative of marginalization.

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