News

What’s your favourite animal? Researchers want to know

28 May 2019

As part of efforts to bring back nature into our cities, researchers are asking people across the globe about their favourite animals to determine which creature is ahead of the pack.

News

Small habitats crucial to species survival: study

10 December 2018

Local patches of bushland play a much bigger role in conserving biodiversity and supporting the survival of endangered species than previously thought, according to new research.

News

Ask not what nature can do for you

09 August 2018

In our recent paper, we ponder whether the increasingly prevalent trend for framing nature in terms of ecosystem services is actually helping to build public engagement in conservation.

Blog

Embracing the chaos

06 August 2018

By transcending disciplinary boundaries researchers can reconceptualise human-nature relations. Issues of the scale of mass species extinctions or climate change are never going to be solved by a single discipline acting alone. 

Blog

Let’s get this straight, habitat loss is the number-one threat to Australia’s species

18 October 2017

Earlier this month, Australia’s outgoing Threatened Species Commissioner Gregory Andrews told ABC radio that land clearing is not the biggest threat to Australia’s wildlife. His claim caused a stir among Australia’s biodiversity scientists and conservation professionals, who have plenty of evidence to the contrary.

News

Insects and the city: Conserving the little things that run our city

23 May 2017

All species in this planet are delicately interlinked to each other in a beautifully complex network of ecological interactions. In cities, insects are key components of urban ecological networks and are greatly impacted by human activities.

Blog

EcoCheck: Victoria’s flower-strewn western plains could be swamped by development

17 May 2016

When Europeans first saw Victoria’s native grasslands in the 1830s, they were struck by the vast beauty of the landscape, as well as its productive potential.