The Planning and Transport in City Regions Program seeks to understand processes of urban development and patterns of mobility at the metro-regional scale, and the policy measures needed to improve the productivity, livability and sustainability of city-regions.

The program is focused on the case of Melbourne as a mega-city in the making and addresses the problems and challenges faced by planners in grappling with the city’s transformation.

The program’s work is nonetheless positioned within a national and international context and looks toward experience elsewhere in metropolitan scale land-use and transport planning to inform its research agenda.

Projects

Innovative responses to urban transportation: current practice in Australian cities

2019–2020

This project investigates drivers and processes of change within Australian metropolitan transport systems to identify future options and directions for policy development.

Western Suburbs Transport Studio (2017)

2017–2018

What’s best for the west? Plan Melbourne 2017-2050 and alternative transport futures for Melbourne’s western suburbs.

Networks and Space: Autonomous Vehicles in Suburban Melbourne Design-Research Studio

2017–2018

Assessing the spatial implications of Autonomous Vehicles as feeders to railway stations in suburban Melbourne

Early delivery of equitable and healthy transport options in new suburbs

2018–2020

The project will produce evidence and tools to assist both the public and private sectors provide transport options to residents of Melbourne’s new suburbs as soon as they move in.

Improved Urban Systems for Liveability

2016–2021

This project investigates how major cities function and the effects of their land-use, housing and infrastructure systems on the humans that live in them.

The Benefits of Elevated Rail: Lessons from the graduate design studio “Rail UP!”

2015–2016

The Victorian state government has committed to removing 50 level crossings in two terms of office: a faster rate of removal than in any other period in the history of railways in Melbourne.

Public Transport Accessibility in the City of Port Phillip

2015

Spatial Network Analysis for Multimodal Urban Transport Systems (SNAMUTS)

Key People

Lead researchers

Dr Tiebei Li

Dr Tiebei Li

Convener of Planning and Transport in City Regions

Associate Professor Andrew Butt

Associate Professor Andrew Butt

Convener of Planning and Transport in City Regions

Program Researchers

Higher Degree by Research Candidates

Related Content

News & Blog

Media

Response, recovery and resilience: experts react to the bushfire crisis

14 January 2020

Our experts respond to Australia's bushfires with perspectives on topics ranging from policy and planning, to community resilience, the mental health of first responders and the psychology of loss.

News

Seven ways the 1969 Transportation Plan shaped Melbourne

12 December 2019

December 12 2019 marks 50 years since the landmark 1969 Transportation Plan. Here, we take a look back on the plan that brought Melbourne its network of freeways and roads, and how its legacy stacks up in 2019.

Blog

We’re still fighting city freeways after half a century

11 December 2019

Like the modernist plans of its time, the 1969 Melbourne Metropolitan Transportation Plan was bold in ambition. Major motorways have been built across the city as a result of the plan.

Blog

The problem with transport models is political abuse, not their use in planning

10 December 2019

On the 50th anniversary of the Melbourne Transportation Plan, we review the role of transport modelling as a planning tool. What are models now telling us about the future of Australian cities?

Blog

50 years on from the Melbourne Transportation Plan

08 December 2019

The 1969 Melbourne Transportation Plan was perhaps the most influential planning policy in the city’s history. Every freeway and major arterial road built since then, as well as many current freeway and tollway projects and proposals, stem from this plan.

Media

Canberra model the key to creating successful new cities

21 October 2019

It often gets a bad rap, but Canberra could hold the secret to planning for Australia’s growing population and successfully decentralising our major cities, researchers say.

Blog

Australian city workers’ average commute has blown out to 66 minutes a day. How does yours compare

31 July 2019

Average daily commuting times across Australia also increased from about 49 minutes in 2002 to almost one hour in 2017 according to the latest Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA).

Blog

Regional cities beware – fast rail might lead to disadvantaged dormitories, not booming economies

17 July 2019

Governments are looking to fast rail services to regional cities to relieve population pressures in major cities, but will subsidising metropolitan workers to live in cheaper regional towns have a positive economic effect?

Blog

Walking and cycling to work makes commuters happier and more productive

04 July 2019

In Australia, more than 9 million people commute to work every weekday. The distance they travel and how they get there – car, public transport, cycling or walking – can influence their well-being and performance at work.

Blog

Of all the problems our cities need to fix, lack of car parking isn’t one of them

17 May 2019

Parking is a fiery issue in Australian cities. That’s because cars dominate our cities, supported by decades of unbalanced planning decisions favouring space for cars over other land uses or forms of transport

Blog

Crowded trains? Planning focus on cars misses new apartment impacts

12 May 2019

Wondering why you can’t get a seat on the train? Perhaps it’s because we don’t actually know how many extra people will use public transport when new building developments are planned.

News

Social and spatial characteristics of the future urban vehicle fleet

05 April 2019

Innovative data use and modelling is helping uncover important questions around social justice in our urban vehicle fleets.

Events

Past Events

Lessons from Vancouver: Transport success and a new mobility agenda

17 March 2020, 5:30PM-7:00PM

Cornerstones of transport success and enabling an innovative new mobility agenda

Past Events

Looking Back and Going Forward: The Melbourne Transport Plan 50 Years On

12 December 2019, 5:30PM-8:30PM

An evening with Melbourne transport experts looking at how our city is still shaped by the 1969 Transportation Plan and where to from here.

Past Events

2019 Transport research symposium: Ethics and transport planning

2 February 2019, 9:00AM-5:00PM

The 2019 Transport Research Symposium brings together activists, academics, and built environment professionals currently working and thinking critically about the ‘state of transport planning’ in Victoria and beyond. 

Past Events

The Ethics of Transport Planning: Lessons From Near and Far

16 August 2018, 6:00PM-7:30PM

This event is Part 2 of the three part series; The Ethics of Transport Planning: A conversation about the past, present and future of transport planning

Past Events

Ethics and Transport Planning: How Do We Fare?

9 August 2018, 6:00PM-7:30PM

This event is Part 1 of the three part series; The Ethics of Transport Planning: A conversation about the past, present and future of transport planning

Past Events

Pathways and barriers to the implementation of mobility pricing in Vancouver

20 July 2018, 12:00PM-1:00PM

In this seminar our guest from Canada, Professor Anthony Perl examines the Commission’s research and public consultation process to assess the progress and pitfalls of advancing a workable mobility pricing scheme for Metro Vancouver.

Past Events

Regional Fast Rail: Prospects, implications and challenges for regional communities

29 May 2018, 6:00PM-7:30PM

This Talking Transport forum brings together people to discuss what high speed rail may mean for regional Victorians.

Past Events

Railway Remedies Cutting the crush on Geelong trains

9 August 2017, 7:30PM-9:00PM

Are your Geelong line trains becoming ever more overcrowded? Do they often run late? Why can’t they be faster? What can and should be done to overcome these problems, now and into the future?